November 2016

Idea Reality Product Design Blog

Helpful and informative posts can be found on our product design blog to help you get you product idea to market.

acute-obtuse-protractor

Hampshire teacher re-invents the protractor

Shelley Frape who teaches at Andover’s Harrow Way School was frustrated with the traditional protractor that has not been changed for around 100 years. The children we finding it confusing and making mistakes by reading the wrong numbers or incorrectly positioning the protractor on the page. Shelley, who is interviewed…
Noti electronic invention design

Interview with Noti inventor

Idea Reality interviewed Haroon James – the inventor of the Noti about his project and his experience developing a new innovative electronic product. Haroon is a digital creative professional from Leicester who had the idea for Noti whilst at university in London.   What is your product? The Noti is…
Gwen and James

Inventor Spotlight

Product: Dragéekíss TM Problem to be solved: A Pearl cake applicator to decorate cakes. Inventor: Gwen Powell and Angelique Meyer. Company: Dragéekíss Ltd   We are delighted to say that the Drageekiss (DK) is now a success having had an enormous impact in the cake industry and cake art internationally…
Nike-Adapt-BB sports product design

Wellness trends in product design for 2019

Wellness industry and consumer technology continues to expand, wellness now taking a central space in our society, as consumers want to feel better and function better. Companies looking to attract and retain employees are starting to look into healthier working environments, bringing wellness to the office and workplace. Here at…
Robert-Moncreiff-Interview-motionlab

Interview with MotionLab Founder – Robert Moncreiff

We are delighted to introduce you to inventor, entrepreneur, creative mind, solving problem person, start-up manager, and marathon runner Rob Moncreiff. A story that we can all relate to. A ten year journey about a driven ideas man with a passion for inventing. A truly inspiring story about a man who took the leap and went for his dream never looking back. The first product idea (of many) that he decided to pursue is a unique backpack design that takes the all weight off your shoulders.

 

Welcome Rob, we are so delighted to have a peek into your journey as an inventor, as an entrepreneur that decides to take the leap and make his dreams a reality. Can you tell us a bit about the ten year journey from working for Shell to starting your own business, how did it all start?

 

Things were going well, I was working for Shell at the time, but I had at the back of my mind that it wasn’t really what I wanted to do, and I always had a dream, to be able to create something and be able to point at it and say

“I made that, and it made the world a better place.”

Rob Moncreiff with motionlab bag

I thought that I wasn’t going to get that accountability and ownership working for a big company, things were a bit slower in Shell. If I wanted to be happy with who I was and what I was doing and what I was achieving, staying in that career wasn’t going to do it. So I sat down and I did some thinking. I wanted to stand on my own and I wanted to create something that is going to change the world. I had a few ideas to look at and I thought that I had a nice set up there. So I took the leap, I jumped out of that career to start working on my own ideas.

 

At the time I didn’t know which one was going to work. But I wouldn’t know until I set on my own and start to look at them– So that’s what I did. I thought that there was a risk that I will never take this leap unless I just do it.

“If you spend too much time looking over the cliff you are never going to make the jump.”

I understand that it can be scary. But I like to think about what the explorer Alastair Humphreys says, he says something like this:

 

"When people are talking about what stops them form taking jumps, and going for adventures, is always things like money, or lack of time, or too much on their plate. But no one is scared about being eaten by an anaconda in South America.”

 

 It is actually just getting off the sofa in the first place. I think we live in a wonderful society. Our lives are very comfortable and it makes it more difficult to fulfill your dreams, because the day to day is more comfy. There will be problems, there will be unexpected things. But it is so much better than wondering, and looking back thinking, maybe I could have done something better, maybe I could have done something incredible! And I never made the first step, I never got up from the sofa on the first place, I never took that leap of faith and risk.

 

You have a broad successful business career, from working for multinationals to creating your own business. You always seem to be active and involved in many different sports from running marathons, skiing, playing tennis and you seem to do all this with an air of ease. Can you tell us more about how do you juggle all of this?

 

 With difficulty, to be honest, so I’m flattered if you think I make it look easy.  I think it’s all about prioritising and realising that everything we do is a choice.  We live in an age of incredible technological advancement and social freedom. That means we are hugely fortunate in the array of opportunities presented to us but the question is what we do with those opportunities.  Social media is a classic example.  It offers huge benefits in terms of connections and sharing ideas, but it can also suck you in.  Being aware that looking at your phone is a conscious decision to stop looking at the world around you makes finding that balance much easier.  

 

It’s the same with the bigger questions and you can’t beat thinking what would make you genuinely happier, assessing what you could do to get there, and then going ahead and making it happen.  Can it be scary? Sure it can, but one of the stupidest questions I hear is “Do you regret your decision?” That’s a very unhealthy way to look at life.  We have no idea what would have happened if we’d made different decisions in the past.

 

I think a healthier question to ask yourself is “Am I making the most of wherever I am today?"  Once you start doing that you take control of your life and start heading towards meaningful goals.  Then life becomes simpler.

 

You have always been coming up with creative and innovative ideas, I remember before we started working on the MotionLab Bag discussing numerous other product ideas of yours, like the tennis training device. Can you talk a little about the 10 steps to designing, creating and selling the most innovative product in the world* as seen on your website. What is your creative process?

 

 Ah that’s an interesting one.  I don’t have a formulaic approach, but I think the key for me is to start with a problem that needs solving, and never give in to the 99% of people who say “It can’t be solved or someone would have done it already.” I like to break a problem down into the simplest parts to really understand what the core issue is. Then it becomes manageable and I mull that specific issue over in the back of my mind.

 

Sometimes you come up with something, and sometimes you don’t but the real work is that solving that issue will create a whole bunch of new, practical problems.  Breaking each one down and solving them all bit by bit until it looks like you might have an idea to solve roughly the whole puzzle is where the real work starts.  

 

The important thing I learned was that having an idea like this is worthless.  

 

You might show your idea to your circle of friends, your family and they might think is very cool. But until you do something with it the problem is still there.

 

The value comes in designing, developing, testing it yourself and handing it to customers to test, and understanding why your original idea will never work.  

 

You then have to adapt your thought process, iterating the process over and over again, solving each new problem as they arrive and modifying, redesigning, retesting to get to an end result that really is a practical solution.

 

In designing the Motionlab Active Commuter bag I went back to the drawing board 7 times, each time wondering if the problem was insoluble, until I realized there was a way around each of those roadblocks.  It’s a hugely frustrating process, especially when you hit dead ends and have to abandon months of work, but I think it's the only way to have confidence in your final product solution.

 

“Remember all that work you put in, understanding why this design works but that one doesn’t, is the value that you add, and means other competitors will struggle to copy you.”

 

That’s my process but I would never suggest that my way of doing this is somehow the “right” way. I think it’s suited to the problems I like to solve which are tangible, real world issues that I have experience of, but we’re all of us unique and if you find a way that works for you then go for it, and good luck.

 

You have managed to conceive, design, patent and successfully launch your own product! Can you tell us a bit more about the commute backpack that takes 100% weight of your shoulders and how it all started?

 

 It all started when I was still working at Shell and I tried running home from the office because the gym was shut.  I just had clothes and shoes in a small bag but it was bouncing around on my shoulders and was horrendously uncomfortable.  Playing around with the shoulder straps improved things and I ended up with the left shoulder strap in my right hand and the right shoulder strap in my left hand, and pulling them across my chest.  I guess that was my first experience of the wraparound harness concept.  It was definitely more comfortable although I was now running down the street with my elbows sticking out like a chicken, but I immediately felt I had something valuable.  I thought maybe a wraparound harness could remove the need for a hip-belt altogether.

 

So, I took my brother’s rucksack, ripped off the straps and hip-belt and sewed them back on in a different configuration. It was an absolute disaster.  BUT I could still see the wraparound harness had some benefits.So then I sewed the hip belt back on and started researching how the body is designed to carry load.  I learned a lot from Google and physios and osteopaths about the natural way to carry weight in the human body. My testing started showing me how traditional backpack designs were preventing this from happening.  That’s how I learned the need for the flexible and extending spine and the BreathEZ buckle system.

 

All that time I was also talking to potential customers, getting feedback on what they looked for in a bag, what problems they faced, and getting some feedback from them after giving them my prototypes to try on. These discussions in the end led to a complete change in the direction of our launch product from a 70 litre bag to a running backpack to a commuting backpack, simply because so many people highlighted the need for a bag that allowed them to go running to work.

 

I was doing all this in the kitchen of my London flat with tools I had from my dad, and my concept prototypes just looked awful.  That’s when I followed up on a chance meeting with some friends to get in touch with James at Idea Reality.  They were able to take my concepts and figure out how to build this into a practical design.  We worked together to continue with the learning process, each iteration getting better and better and allowing us to give the bag to consumers to get further feedback.  We learned entirely new problems and had to put our heads together to figure out solutions like the retracting hip-belt.  It’s been a long, long process, but I’m really proud of what we have today.    

motionlab bag gif

You have turned your idea into a business and successfully funded it via kickstarter.com. The first batch of products is shipping to backers as we speak and we can’t wait to receive ours. Can you tell us about your product launch experience and any advice you have for those wanting to do the same?

 

 Yeah, this is all really exciting.  Crowdfunding on Kickstarter and Indiegogo enabled us to effectively pre-sell 230 bags which gave us the funding for an initial production run.  It also gives us access to a community of people who are really excited to see this product come to reality and are really engaged so we’re looking forward to getting a lot of feedback.  That’s super important because the best feedback is from someone who has actually paid money for the product.  

Crowdfunding is a great way to launch a product as you get orders and the money up front so you can hit the minimum orders for production runs.  However a lot of people see the crowdfunding success stories hitting double or triple their targets and think you just put your product out there and it sells.  No way.  You need to really work on your Kickstarter page to explain your product well, do a lot of marketing before and during the campaign, and keep fighting for every sale.  Realistically you’re doing well to hit your target on your first campaign.  From what I see it is only a few products (and nearly always the second or third campaign for a particular product) that go stratospheric.

 

Also allows lots of time to do your research on production.  Go meet with the factory and make sure you have good control of costs.  There are some products launched very successfully on Kickstarter that have since gone bankrupt because their costs increased and they were losing money on every sale.  

 

For us this is an exciting time.  Finally launching validates everything we’ve been working on all these years, but this isn’t crossing the finish line, it’s more like crossing the starting line.  We plan to use Kickstarter again to fund our next production run of the Active Commute bag in summer 2019, and meanwhile we’ll be working with Idea Reality to put our innovative technology into a 70litre backpack for trekkers and travellers.  


The bag has also won an award! Can you tell us more about this experience?

 

This was great actually.  Idea Reality put this design forward for the CreativePool Design awards in 2018.  It's a very prestigious award and I must say, I wasn’t expecting much to come of it.  However we were delighted to take Gold place in the Industrial/Product category!  A really great night, surrounded by some huge names in design, and it was great to have our product recognized for its innovative design by some really big names in the industry.  However confident you pretend to be, that sort of accreditation really helps to think we must be doing something right.

  

We think Motionlab is a truly innovative product and it seems that there could be many more applications for this technology. What do you have on your sleeve for the future?

 

 We cut our teeth on the Motionlab Active Commute bag because it satisfied a very relevant, niche community of people wanting a more comfortable way to commute to work and fit in their exercise at the same time.  However, we’re really excited about the broader opportunities for this technology.  It can be applied to any load carried on your back and we’re currently looking at the big 70 liter bag for trekking and military use.

 

 After that I’m excited about developing our product range to a skiing and snowboarding bag, a climbing bag, a baby carrier, schoolbags, MTB bags, and anything else you can think of.  We’re even discussing how we could help firefighters with their need to carry heavy breathing apparatus without constraining their movement.  If you think of a sport or activity where carrying a load more comfortably, with greater stability and freedom of movement counts, and avoiding damage to your back and shoulders then drop us an email at [email protected] and let us know.  

Read the Full Case Study

Read about the project plan and design challenges along the way!

IR 1. Doggy Goggles

5 Weird But Wonderful Ideas Which Sold Millions

From psychic 8 balls to wigs for your dog, the world is full of wacky and wonderful products and inventions. But if the creators of these weird ideas which sold millions were to listen to those around them who didn't believe in their ability to bring these creations to life and then to market, they wouldn’t be rolling in the millions their products have earned them to date. Not bad for hamster helicopters and baby mops, right?

 

At Idea Reality we believe there is no such thing as a bad idea and will endeavour to create your products and ideas, however good or ridiculously good they are.

 

Here is our countdown of just 5 examples of what at first glance look like concoctions and contraptions that belong in the bargain bucket, but are proof that if you believe in yourself and your ideas, anything is possible!

 

5. In at number five are the doggy goggles that boggled our mind, and that’s before we found out the net worth of the company was £2 million. From a sky diving St Bernard to a mastiff on a motorbike these guys have you covered!

 

Image result for toilet night light

Image Credit: Google Images

 

4. In at number two…sorry we mean number four is the toilet night light. An illuminating toilet seat for those late night visits when you are just too sleepy to turn the bathroom light on. This product has sold nearly $300,000 worth of units. Whatever your reason for the product or idea there is success to be had so never flush a potential money maker down the toilet!

 

Image result for bunch o balloons

Image Credit: Google Images

 

3. Ever lacked ammunition in a really important water balloon fight? Well one genius dad created the ‘Bunch o Balloons’ multiple water balloon filler. We can guess which kids were top of the neighbourhood score chart that summer! An excellent example of how one small idea one holiday afternoon can transform into a $900,000 business.

 

Image result for lucky break wishbones

Image Credit: Google Images

 

2. Plastic Wishbones… yes you heard it right! Never again will the family fall out over a wish on Thanksgiving, thanks to one man at Lucky Break Wish Bones. Whether it’s a box of 5 or a crate of 500 there’s a wishbone for every occasion. He certainly wasn’t being a chicken when he plucked up the courage to launch this idea. Especially with these plastic bird sternums bring in approximately $800,000 a year.

 

Image result for the pet rock company

Image Credit: Google Images

 

1. Coming in at number one is the epitome of not giving up on your ideas. The Pet Rock company is estimated to be worth £15 million. When ordering from The Pet Rock Company, you will receive a 'pet' stone, a certificate of authenticity, and a box - who knew that we would love pet rocks so much! We think this is the perfect gift for someone who would love a pet but perhaps just hasn't got enough time for walkies.

 

With our top 5 weird ideas which sold millions, we invite you to test your idea - get our FREE online idea review by one of our lead designers. All of your ideas are under NDA so the secret will stay between you and us.

Idea Reality Marketing Innovation

How To Use Your Innovation As Your Marketing Tool

We have seen this more and more - innovative companies are using their forward-thinking ideas as brilliant marketing tools, and getting ahead of their competition.

 

Often when businesses think of innovation, they think of sci-fi-esque futuristic gadgets or simple changes in their office to help the workforce operate quicker and seamlessly. But innovation can help your brand stand out and strengthen the messages you are sending out to your potential customers. If your brand allows your customers to experience it, the way they feel after using your service of product will have a much longer lasting effect than any ad you publish.

 

Image result for samsung life saving truck

*Image taken from Google Images

To give you an example, Samsung created a life saving truck inspired by the alarming statistics of traffic deaths on Argentina’s narrow roads. This prototype truck had a wireless camera mounted on the front, and was live-streaming its view onto a huge wall of Samsung video screens on the back of the vehicle. Pretty memorable and effective - one you'll remember when choosing your TV.

 

Another example is Norwegian Air who enabled free Wi-Fi on their planes improving their passengers experience and changing the perceptions of their brand. A cheap airline who not only promises to trump the fares of their competitors but also offers free Wi-Fi on board - we know who we would choose *opens Instagram for live stream of the sunset sky*.

 

Image result for volvo life paint

*Image taken from Google Images

Another great example is the Volvo Life Paint, created with the brand ethos in mind: safety first. The UK team produced a reflective safety spray paint which helps cyclists be seen on the road and helps them keep safe.

 

And to finish our round up of some great innovation marketing we present to you Gatorade who created a bottle cap technology which measures your hydration rates - the smart bottle uses a microchip and disposable sweat patch to update users on the amount of sodium they lost, and flashes to remind you to drink (a Gatorade of course!)

 

A glowing red “change” neon on a wall

 

What we can take away from these examples is that innovation and marketing go hand in hand - use your great ideas and changes to a marketing advantage, and be memorable.

 

The benefits of innovation marketing are:
- You will stand out in front of competitors
- You will help strengthen your brand core values
- You will be remembered by your potential customers and subconsciously employ brand ambassadors

 

And remember to have fun with innovation! Try new things, test out products, create prototypes... We can help you along the way!

Idea Reality Blog

9 Successful People Who Failed The First Time

If at first we don't succeed... We will try, try, and try again! It can be disheartening to give your all to a project or a venture and not have it turn out the way you want it to. The word 'failure' is something most people are scared of. But we think failure is just a learning curve on the way to success - just looks at these successful people failed the first time!

 

1. Thomas Edison. When Edison was young, his teachers told him he was ‘too stupid to learn anything’. But later in life, Edison went to hold more than 1,000 patents! Including a product  which we use every single day today: the electric lamp.

 

2. Albert Einstein. We know Einstein as the icon of intelligence, but he had some set backs. When he was a child Einstein didn’t start speaking until he was four, nor reading until he was seven, and doctors thought him to have learning difficulties. Later in life, Einstein won a Nobel Prize and changed how we think of physics. 

 

3. Oprah Winfrey. We now know Oprah as a billionaire with her own TV channel, but did you know that she was fired from her first job as a TV anchor? But Oprah never gave up and carried on going - this is her quote relating to previous experience:
“There is no such thing as failure. Failure is just life trying to move us in another direction.”

 

4. Walt Disney. If Disney listened to his former newspaper editor, there would be less magic in the world. Why? Because he was told he lacked imagination and had no good ideas. Fast forward to today and Disney is an iconic name in multiple industries; his parks have been built with ample imagination and creativity; and his ideas have been adopted by some of the most successful businesses. Walt Disney's thoughts on failure:

"I think it's important to have a good hard failure when you're young... Because it makes you kind of aware of what can happen to you. Because of it I've never had any fear in my whole life when we've been near collapse and all of that. I've never been afraid."

 

5. Steven Spielberg. His movies have grossed more than $9 billion and Spielberg won three Academy Awards - we all know his name. But it wasn't always smooth sailing: Spielberg was rejected not once but twice by the University of Southern California’s School of Cinematic Arts. The university has now built a building in honour of the movie maker.

 

6. J.K. Rowling. Prior to the fame and fortune of Harry Potter, Rowling was a broke, depressed single mother who carried on her passion in writing whilst keeping up her studies. She is now one of the richest women in the world, and this is her take on failure:

"It is impossible to live without failing at something, unless you live so cautiously that you might as well not have lived at all - in which case, you fail by default."

 

7. Stephen King. Known as one of the most illustrious novelists, Stephen King is no stranger to rejection. His first book, Carrie, was turned down by publishers 30 times! A discouraged King threw his book in the bin, however his wife saved it and motivated him to try again, which led to his first book deal.

 

8. Charles Darwin. Darwin has shaped our understanding of the world, but when he was a student his teachers deemend him average and he event dropped out of his career in medicine. He later embarked on a different journey to study nature, and led to 'On the Origin of Species' which has made the biggest impact on how we look at our existence. 

 

9. Sir James Dyson. Do you ever feel like giving up on a product when things don't go to plan? Dyson had a total number of 5,126 failed prototypes over the course of 15 years. That did not stop him from carrying on to create the best-selling vaccum cleaner which led to his net worth of $4.5billion.

 

So if you ever feel like giving up, don't. What we can learn from the successes of these talented individuals is that not many people get it right the first time; and that nothing great comes easy. Take advantage of our free Inventor's Advice Pack; and if you need help we're an e-mail click away: [email protected]

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